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Showing posts from June 11, 2017

Review: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

Jim Carrey plays the introverted Joel, who meets and falls in love with the impulsive Clementine (Kate Winslet), thus beginning a rocky relationship. Eventually it ends, and not long after Joel finds out that Clementine has had a procedure performed to erase any memory of Joel and their time together as a couple. Absolutely gutted and distraught, Joel seeks out Dr. Mierzwiak (A hangdog Tom Wilkinson) to have same procedure done to him. Later that night, technicians Stan (Mark Ruffalo) and Patrick (Elijah Wood) turn up at Joel’s apartment to begin the procedure. Semi-conscious through the experience, Joel learns that Patrick has unethically sought out Clementine to start dating her himself. Meanwhile, Joel begins to regret his decision and wants to keep his memories of Clementine and fight for their love. He attempts to seek out Clementine in his memories and hide her from the technicians. David Cross and Jane Adams play the couple’s friends, while Kirsten Dunst is a secretary currentl…

Review: Monk Comes Down the Mountain

Wang Baoqiang plays He Anxia, who was dropped off as a baby his parents at a Taoist monk temple. Eventually cast out to fend for himself as an adult, he comes across various masters who each teach him something, including a monk-turned-herbalist (Fan Wei), who has a shifty brother (Vanness Wu) who is having an affair with the herbalist’s wife. Other mentors include a martial artist turned Peking Opera star (Chang Chen), and humble Taoist priest Zhou Xiyu (Aaron Kwok). Meanwhile, Danny Chan’s Zhao Xinchuan turns up essentially to introduce the film’s main villain, his mentor Peng Qianwu (Yuen Wah), who is also feuding with Zhou Xiyu. Jaycee Chan, son of Jackie has a small role as a young upstart.

Man I was rooting for this 2015 wuxia flick from Chen Kaige (the well-received “Farewell My Concubine”). It was going so well, too. A Jackie Chan-esque blend of action, fantasy, and comedy but with a much more charismatic, likeable and less annoying lead actor/character in infectious Wang Baoq…

Review: Soul Men

Two 70s soul back-up singers (Played by the late Bernie Mac and the great Samuel L. Jackson) are asked to reunite to perform at a memorial concert for their recently deceased superstar lead singer (musician John Legend) at the famous Apollo Theatre. The problem? The duo are washed up...oh, and they violently hate one another. Mac has become a shonky car wash owner (specialising in free ‘rim jobs’), whilst ex-con Jackson is now a mechanic who wants nothing to do with Mac or the music industry. So naturally when Mac comes calling at his apartment, he’s very happy to see him (a punch to the jaw ‘happy’). But eventually Mac and Jackson put aside their...well actually, they don’t, but they end up agreeing to do the concert at least. So they drive from California to New York (Jackson will not fly), doing the occasional warm-up gig, and slowly but surely getting their old chemistry back. Sean Hayes plays the a-hole promoter, Jennifer Coolidge plays a busty MILF (her stock and trade) whom pro…

Review: Jane Got a Gun

Set out west in the late 1800s, Natalie Portman is the title character, whose husband (Noah Emmerich) has been shot full of holes and barely alive. He tells his wife that they’re coming for them. ‘They’ are the deadly gang of outlaws headed by black-hatted Bishop (Ewan McGregor), who had previously forced Jane into prostitution (Emmerich being the only nice one of the bunch, eventually turning on his fellow outlaws). Rather than run, Jane drops her daughter off with a friend and calls upon Dan Frost (Joel Edgerton) to help out. Frost is Jane’s former lover who went off to fight in the Civil War only to come back after and find his girl married to another man, thinking Frost was dead. He’s initially very much against helping the woman who broke his heart and the man who helped her break it. Nonetheless, he does the right thing and comes to her aid as Bishop and his men descend upon their property. That’s Joel’s brother Nash Edgerton as a man getting tortured by Bishop early on.

This tr…

Review: Stargate

Egyptologist James Spader is ridiculed for some of his wild theories about the origins of the Egyptian Pyramids, but he might just get a chance to prove he is right. He is hired by the US Government to translate what appear to be Egyptian hieroglyphics on a giant circular ring. Given the film’s title, you might surmise that the ring is a Stargate, a portal between worlds. Spader is asked to join a military team headed by suicidal Colonel Kurt Russell, a still-grieving father whose son’s death he blames himself for. The team will travel through the Stargate, and investigate the world on the other side. However, Russell is given secret orders of his own, in case the situation on the other side is of threat to our world. Not surprisingly (at least for anyone who has ever seen a movie before) they encounter a race of innocent slaves (who may or may not be displaced human beings) being ruled over by a sinister, megalomaniacal entity known as Ra (Jaye Davidson), whose cohorts seem inspired …

Review: V for Vendetta

2020. Britain is a Totalitarian state run by dictatorial Chancellor Sutler (John Hurt), and much of the rest of the world has crumbled. Media is censored, all forms of art, literature, culture, and even the Koran are banned. A young woman named Evey (Natalie Portman) is saved from some sleazy secret police officers by a strange vigilante in a Guy Fawkes mask and Zorro-like hat, named V (Hugo Weaving). Evie, a gopher at the government’s propaganda TV network later saves V’s life. She eventually finds herself caught up in his cause, initially unwittingly but eventually more committed. You see V, a mixture of Guy Fawkes, “The Count of Monte Cristo” and an anarchic terrorist, has been carrying out explosive activities on various London monuments all a part of his eventual plan to overthrow the Chancellor’s oppressive government. It’s also all tied to an incident from V’s past that only slowly reveals itself. Tim Pigott-Smith plays the Chancellor’s vile right-hand man, Stephen Fry plays Ev…